Bell’s palsy

Bell's palsy or paralysis is also called idiopathic facial paralysis. This entity does not include facial paralyses of other origin, such as after trauma, tumor or after surgery. Its cause is unknown. It could occur due to microcirculatory disturbances that lead to edema of facial nerve within the bone canal the nerve goes through. As a consequence, that causes increased pressure affecting the nerve, insufficient blood supply and paresis. This palsy heals spontaneously in some 80% of all
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Acute poisoning by carbon monoxide, cyanides, pesticides, nitrites and tetra-chloride

The most common source of CO poisoning are exhaust gases of automobile engines, heating systems, fumes from faulty chimneys and fumes from industrial sources. CO blocks transport, availability and utilization of oxygen in the body due to its extremely high affinity for hemoglobin, which is the principal carrier of oxygen to various tissues and organs. As a consequence, damage to the tissues occurs, mainly in the tissues with high oxygen demand, such as brain and heart. HBOT hastens
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About us

About us
Polyclinic for hyperbaric and occupational medicine OXY is a private, highly specialized medical institution active in the field of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. It was founded in Pula, Croatia, in 1996. Through its activities, the Polyclinic in a special way continues and develops traditions of Croatian hyperbaric oxygenation, always streaming towards excellence. Our basic activity is hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO, HBO2T, HBOT), i.e. therapeutic application of oxygen that patients breathe at
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Historical development of HBOT

History of development of hyperbaric oxygenation in the world 1772. Carl Wilhelm Scheele, Swedish chemist, discovered oxygen, naming it "fire air". 1774. Joseph Priestly, British chemist, repeating the experiments done previously by Scheele, also "discovers" oxygen, but his name has traditionally remained connected with the historical fact of oxygen discovery, although erroneously. 1789. Lavoisier and Seguin describe oxygen toxicity effects. 1796. Beddoes and Watt published
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