ARE THERE ANY SIDE EFFECTS OF HBOT?

HBOT side effects do exist but are very rare and usually very mild in nature. Transient and benign changes in visual acuity could occur, but usually after a prolonged use. You should save you prescription glasses even if you feel that your vision has improved, because after some time your visual acuity will return to the original values. You should therefore postpone your visual acuity check-up for some four months after the completion of HBOT. If you have eye cataract, some risk of its
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WHAT ABOUT THE BANDAGING WHILE I WAS IN THERAPY?

During your stay with us, if you would request such a service, our experts will provide care of your wounds. We are very much proud of our skills and are aware that excellence doesn't come by chance. The doctor will give you the explanation of our procedure and modern materials we apply in order to enhance wound healing. Due to various reasons, wound care and dressing might differ from what you are accustomed to and will depend entirely on your treatment. You will be notified about any
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WHAT IS HYPERBARIC OXYGENATION - HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY (HBOT)?

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment method that is implemented in hyperbaric chambers, by breathing of 100% oxygen through a facemask or helmet. At elevated pressure in the hyperbaric chamber, oxygen is dissolved in blood, similar to the bubbles that are dissolved in sparkling water at elevated pressure, and thus delivered in large amounts even to those tissues to which damaged circulation would not be able to deliver it.
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Enhancement of healing in selected problem wounds

Problem wounds represent a significant and growing challenge in every healthcare system. The incidence and prevalence of these wounds are increasing in the population resulting in growing utilization of healthcare resources and money expended. Venous leg ulcers represent the most common lower extremity wound seen in ambulatory wound care centers with recurrences frequent and often bad outcomes. Pressure ulcers are common in patients in long term institutional care settings adding significant
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Crohn’s disease, ulcerous colitis, pseudomembranous colitis

Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation that affects the entire tube of the digestive system. It could indeed affect any part of the digestive system, but the most common locations are terminal ileum and colon. Usual symptoms include chronic diarrhea, sometimes with traces of blood and mucus, spastic abdominal pain, increased body temperature, lack of appetite and loss of body weight. The cause has not been discovered yet, but it is assumed that some
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Cerebral insult and brain and spinal cord injuries

Cerebral insult (insult, weakness, cerebral palsy) is a sudden neurological deficit caused by disturbance of brain blood flow. The term includes both ischemic and hemorrhagic incident. Ischemic cerebral insult happens when a blood clot or embolus blocks or slows down blood flow in the brain artery, thus blocking transport of oxygen and glucose that are necessary for regular function of the brain. It could be also caused by a spasm of brain arteries, without any obstruction of the arterial
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Diabetic disease with complications

Regardless of all usual measures, diet, exercise, surgical care and drug therapy, all complications of diabetic disease are an indication for HBOT. However, HBOT also plays an important role in the prevention of complications. "Diabetic foot" (please, check the part about chronic wounds) Arterial insufficiency I. - IV. degree and diabetic angiopathy: HBOT induces anti-oxidative defense mechanisms important for slowing down the atherosclerotic process and for correction of the existing
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Headache

Vascular headaches include migraine (with or without aura) and cluster-headaches. Migraine is a term used to define a group of severe usually unilateral repetitive headaches, accompanied by nausea, photofobia, sonophobia and vomiting. Some 30%-40% of all migraine attacks start with an aura, with transient neurological defects, that appear some 20 minutes before the actual headache attack. It is considered that aura is connected with focal reduction of circulation in the brain that is
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Dysbaric osteonecrosis

Dysbaric osteonecrosis is a term used to describe aseptic or avascular bone necrosis due to ischemia caused by gas bubbles, although the exact mechanism is still a matter of controversy. Typically it is a disease of deep-sea professional divers but affects more often recreational divers as well. Most commonly are affected long bones of arm and leg. The symptoms develop after a delay lasting from several months to several years after decompression. Diaphyseal damages are painless. Pain and
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Problem wounds (chronic wounds)

HBOT is widely used to treat chronic wounds and ulcers caused by arterial insufficiency, as well as diabetic, venous, decubital, trophic and neuropathic ulcers. Diabetic ulcers usually affect feet, hence the name "diabetic foot". Pathological process on arteries persists even in patients with well-controlled glycaemia. As a result of that process, occlusive disease of large blood vessels and pathological changes on small blood vessels could develop. Additional problems include diabetic
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Burns and frostbites

Burn is thermal injury that causes damage and necrosis of skin and subcutaneous tissue. The depth and severity of damage depends on strength of heat source and time of exposure. Tissue damage includes also blood cells damage that results in edema and inflammatory reaction.   Frostbite injury is local and acute damage of skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by a prolonged exposure to extreme cold. Most commonly affected are peripheral body parts, such as nose, ears, fingers and
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Chronic refractory osteomyelitis

Osteomyelitis is an inflammation of bone tissue caused by an infective agent. Infection of a bone could occur after fracture or if an infectious focus in the very proximity of a bone exists (infection from the outside or exogenous infection) or could enter a bone by blood (hematogenous infection, infection from the inside or endogenous infection). In the affected bone tissue apparent are ischemia and hypoxia. Clinical picture could be manifested as acute, subacute or chronic. Chronic
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Brain abscess

Numerous infectious organisms could cause brain abscess, amongst them the most often are anaerobes. Due to its structure, lack of vascular network and oxygen, abscess is difficult to treat with antibiotics that are otherwise first therapeutic option. Surgical drainage is used in encapsulated abscesses that would not heal or cause increase of intracranial pressure. Morbidity due to cerebral abscess is high, and there are severe neurological residua in the survived. In complicated case, when
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Acute traumatic ischemia (crush and compartment syndrome, blast injuries)

Crush injury is a severe injury of two or more tissues (muscles, bones, other connective tissues, skin, nerves) that jeopardizes their survival due to its extensiveness. Consecutive edema and damage to blood vessels increases lack of oxygen and leads to irreparable tissue damage and loss of function. Under hypoxic conditions, the tissues lose ability to fight infection and recovery from injury is also jeopardized. The basis of the treatment is wound and fracture care, antibiotic treatment
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Bell’s palsy

Bell's palsy or paralysis is also called idiopathic facial paralysis. This entity does not include facial paralyses of other origin, such as after trauma, tumor or after surgery. Its cause is unknown. It could occur due to microcirculatory disturbances that lead to edema of facial nerve within the bone canal the nerve goes through. As a consequence, that causes increased pressure affecting the nerve, insufficient blood supply and paresis. This palsy heals spontaneously in some 80% of all
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Sudden loss of vision

Sudden loss of vision most commonly occurs as a consequence of obstruction of central retinal artery, that is usually a part of atherosclerotic or inflammatory arterial disease, but also due to other disturbances. The most common symptom is sudden and painless unilateral blindness caused by a clot from atherosclerotic plaque of the carotid artery on the same side. Although blindness develops within seconds, retina cells are relatively resistant to hypoxia and could survive even up to 22
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Sudden deafness and/or tinnitus

Sudden deafness is hearing damage that occurs suddenly within several hours or days. The cause of sudden hearing loss is most often difficult if not impossible to establish. It could happen after a viral infection, but also due to vascular changes, autoimmune disease or the cause could remain unrevealed. None of the existing theories has been univocally accepted. The damage most often occurs unilaterally, and is manifested as sudden hearing loss in one ear, feeling of fullness and blockage,
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